As of 2017, 26 states and the District of Columbia have laws legalizing marijuana for either medicinal or recreational use. Pot has become a $6.7 billion industry in the U.S. and Canada – and one of the most energy intensive.

Marijuana farms require 24/7 power to provide the growing conditions necessary to keep up with demand. Lighting, heating, ventilation, and A/C, sometimes in multiple facilities at multiple sites, push a demand for power that could soon strain the electrical grid and, in some cases, already does. Some growers are taking matters into their own hands and installing backup power systems at their farms. 

Benefitting From Backup Power

Marijuana growers have perfected their farming techniques to maximize growth (and income) year-round – and that requires constant power. Since many operations are indoors, power is needed to ensure plants receive the light they need. Even one day without light can harm marijuana plants. For facilities without windows or access to natural light, a power outage spells certain doom.

Another concern is keeping the ambient air temperature stable. Once the weather turns chilly, you’ll need to crank up the heat lamps or turn up the thermostat. Anything under 50 degrees can harm plants and freezing temps can kill them!

The very best way to ensure your marijuana growing operation always has the power it needs is to install a backup power system like a standby generator. Standby generators run on natural gas, propane or diesel fuel and can be hooked right in to the building’s electrical system. As soon as there’s a dip in power, the system can be set up to automatically kick on and keep all of your electrical systems operating as normal.

Standby or backup power generators operate completely independent of the local power grid. They only turn on when the main power supply stops for some reason. They can be customized to meet just about any power demand and can be wired to turn on automatically or manually. 

Can You Afford To Protect Your Crop?

There’s a preconceived notion that backup generators and power systems are prohibitively expensive. Many marijuana farmers then think that there is no way they can afford to install a backup power system, but, for certain areas of the country, that’s a very risky assumption. A better question to ask is if you can afford NOT to install backup power. How much do you stand to lose if a crop goes bad? Compare than to the cost of a new, used, or surplus generator to get an idea of whether or not the investment will pay off.